The Fifth Rule Week #1: Illustrator

This illustration represents the scene in the book where Reef Kennedy is giving a very emotional speech at Frank Colville’s funeral. Reef is holding back his tears during his speech. He had prepared a speech on his way to Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada but when he stepped up to give his speech he realized that the speech that he had prepared wasn’t going to impact the people and tell them about the Frank that saved Reef’s life. Reef folded the paper and started speaking from his heart which really impacted the people sitting before him. I think this picture relates to this scene because it is a picture of Adam Sandler giving an eulogy in the movie Mr. Deeds.

A sketch of Adam Sandler in Mr. Deeds

This illustration represents the scene in the book where Reef Kennedy is giving a very emotional speech at Frank Colville’s funeral. Reef is holding back his tears during his speech. He had prepared a speech on his way to Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada but when he stepped up to give his speech he realized that the speech that he had prepared wasn’t going to impact the people and tell them about the Frank that saved Reef’s life. Reef folded the paper and started speaking from his heart which really impacted the people sitting before him. I think this picture relates to this scene because it is a picture of Adam Sandler giving an eulogy in the movie Mr. Deeds.

The Fifth Rule Week #1: The Connector

Name: Trent Arnold

Book: The Fifth Rule

Pages: 1-54

The Connector

Event #1: Reef is getting patted down at the door to Sukorov’s apartment.

 

Type of connection: Connection:
Text to self Even though I have never been in a situation as serious as reef’s, I can relate to the feeling of being searched. When I was in Ottawa this winter I visited the parliament buildings. Similar to the way Reef was greeted, I was met at the door by very large security guards and had to walk through an “airport like” metal detector followed by a pat down. I had nothing to hide but the fact that I had to be searched made me somewhat uncomfortable.

 

Event #2: Reef speaks at Frank’s funeral.

 

Type of connection: Connection:
Text to text When reading this scene it reminded me of the movie Happy Gilmore, because Happy’s mentor Chubbs died in a tragedy and also impacted Happy’s life. Chubbs was not only his golf coach, but was his friend and mentor. I imagine that Frank influenced Reef’s life in a similar way.

 

Event #3: Leeza thinks about her father, and explains how he has abandoned his family.

 

Type of connection: Connection:
Text to world Divorce affects children and young adults across the world, and Leeza’s situation is no different. With her father out of the picture she is left with only a mother. While her mother does her best to care for Leeza, she is seen as overprotective by Leeza. Her father did not even attend his daughter’s funeral (Leeza’s sister) and this upset Leeza and caused her to dislike her father.

With the first eight chapters behind us, we can predict what might happen in the future. Since our book is split between two points of view, we can make a prediction for both Leeza and Reef.

For Reef, I think that we will see him encounter Sukorov again. The book left the thought of the mobster and shifted to Frank. In the pages including Sukorov, there was a lot of tension between him and Reef, and I think that that is a sign of what’s to come.

For Leeza, it’s hard to predict what might happen next, but I assume that Reef and Leeza’s paths will cross in the near future. Leeza talked for a while about how Reef was the cause of her injuries, but how he was also one of the people who helped her the most during the tough times.

The Fifth Rule Week 1: Summarizer

This book starts out in a very interesting manner. In Calgary, Reef Kennedy, a construction worker, has a meeting with a Russian mob boss named Sukorov. He insists that Sukorov and his men not to hassle the kids at Safe Haven Unitarian. He then challenges Sukorov with empty but clever threats and Sukorov backs off. In the next chapter, it introduces a character named Leeza. She had been woken up by a bad dream. In this same chapter, there is a bit of foreshadowing at the end mentioning that she knew that something in the universe had shifted. The focus then shifts back to Reef. He is at a funeral giving his eulogy for a man named Frank Colville. Frank was sort of a foster parent figure that ran North Hills and took in Reef and turned his life around, from a troubled kid to a hard working man. He then reveals that he was the person who threw a rock off a highway bridge causing a woman to crash and be hospitalized. That woman was named Leeza, as mentioned in chapter 2. After Reef was done with his eulogy, he met up with some old friends he knew at North Hill. They were Greg Matheson, Owen White, Keith Benjamin, Jimmy Franz, and Gordy Towers. Greg then offers Reef to stay at his place during the time he is in Calgary. Reef says to the rest that he has to go answer the interviewers questions outside the church they were in. Everything in the interview was under control until a critic named Rolan Decker started to get more aggressive and asked uncomfortable questions that provoked the crowd to ask more uncomfortable questions. Reef had enough and started to run as the crowd followed him. The focus then shifts over to Leeza sitting in her house. She has a conversation with her overprotective mom. After she goes out to sunbathe and think about the past and Reef, how he got her into the accident. Suddenly, a car pulls up and a voice told him to get in. Reef was relieved and got in. The people in the car were his friends Jink and Bigger. They conversed and then drove to the green house where Frank made Reef rebuild. That was when he was inspired to become a better person.

The Fifth Rule Week #1: Word Wizard

 

Page # Word, Phrase, Or Passage Reason for Selecting Word, Phrase, Or Passage Why did the author select this word or phrase? What is the author trying to say? How does the diction help the author achieve his or her purpose?
1 He wonders about the person on the other end of the of those cameras, wonders what it must be like to spend all day scrutinizing everyone who enters and leaves. I chose this word because its a really powerful word in a powerful sentence. When I read this sentence I stopped to find its meaning and it really got me thinking. To show that Reef is agitated at the fact that Mr. Sukorov is an evil guy and is being super careful not to get caught. The author is trying express that Sukorov’s guard is examining each and every person carefully. The word helps the author because it is a word with alot of meaning and is exactly what the author was looking for.
13 Yes, they’d fought–what sisters didn’t?–but they were best friends, had loved each other unconditionally, always had each other’s backs. I chose this word because is has a deep and intense meaning. To show how much Leeza loves Ellen, her deceased sister. The author is trying is trying to get through the message that Leeza loves and misses Ellen no matter what happens. It helps the author the word is very powerful and meaningful. The author was telling us the degree of sisterly love between Leeza and Ellen.
15 But the words were meaningless now. I chose this word because it helps construct a very emotional scene. To tell that Reef had to speak from his heart. The word is very meaningful and strong. He is trying to tell us that if Reef doesn’t speak from his heart, he won’t impact the people before him. It helps him explain that the speech that Reef had prepared had no meaning compared to who Frank really was.
17 I was the guy that threw the rock. I chose this passage because it is the first time Reef admits his mistake to the press and public. To show us that the press didn’t reveal that before, since he was a minor. The author is trying to tell us that Reef admits his mistakes and is a changed person. It helps the author let Reef make an important statement in simple words.
 17 Tears well up again and he struggles to hold them backs as he continues to speak, I chose this passage because it is a very emotional part of the book. To show that Reef loves Frank very much and is very sad, but he doesn’t want to show it. He is trying to tell us that Reef is afraid of breaking down in front of the people at the funeral. It helps him because it is very simple and descriptive. It also shows us what Reef is feeling on the inside.

passage master week 1

“He wishes he could tell Sukrov how, although he liked the work and the growing balance in his bank account from the beginning, he hadn’t felt content his first few weeks out here. The guys who are in the construction crew are great but the ones who aren’t married are into the bar and brawl scene, and he was looking for more than that, something that would help ease the ache he still feels when he let his mind drift back to what happened two year ago in Nova Scotia. It was Frank who suggested he try filling his free time with the kind of work he’d done in Halifax a year ago.”

Although this is not significant to the story I found it to be an interesting and enlightening passage, it introduces Reefs character and what he believes in. Reef seems to have a troubled past that has allowed him to grow but not quite move on. In this passage it seems as though Reef dislikes tough guys who can get him into trouble, this may be due to his past experiences, which is vaguely mentioned here. Reef has clearly travelled quite a distance, as he says “what happened two years ago in Nova Scotia”. The story presently takes place in Calgary, this was thought provoking and pushed me to wonder what reasons may have made Reef want to move.

“Reef looks down at Greg Matheson who smiles with encouragement. “Some’ a you may remember seein’ in the news a couple years ago a story about a seventeen year old who threw a rock off an overpass into traffic. It caused an accident that nearly killed one’a drivers. She ended up in a coma for three weeks and then went through months of painful surgeries ’n’ rehabilitation learnin’ to walk again, learnin’ to do all the things the rest of us take for granted every day.” He takes a deep breath. “I was the guy who threw that rock.””

This is a crucial part of the story, it explains everything we have been reading about thus far. This passage discusses the extent of the women’s injuries and is a lens into the guilt that Reef feels for the accident. Reef senses an obligation to admit what he had done to the public even though he did not have to. The reason for Reef coming out about his past with Leeza and the rock was because he felt it was a form of respect to Frank. This is also very important passage because it connects the things that happened to Leeza with Reef tying the two characters together. This also shows exactly how troubled Reef was. Though Reef speaks about his past a lot he never goes into too much detail of what exactly he did up until this point. This passage also shows how much Reef has changed over time. Two years ago he was willing to take the life of a seventeen year old girl away without caring at all, now he can barely talk about it without choking up.

“She tries to force herself to be friendlier sometimes but even casual relationships seem unnatural to her now, like she’s learning the steps to a complicated dance and she’s always one beat behind. In conversation, she finds herself always asking people questions and, during their replies, thinking up something else to ask, afraid of a lull that might focus attention on her. She dislikes telling people what she really thinks, how she really feels. Brett is her only friend who sees through her, won’t let her get away with saying nothing, but even with her it isn’t easy. Like today.”

I feel as though this passage really introduces Leeza’s character. The accident which happened because of Reef not only physically wounded her but emotionally as well. I believe Reef was not only the perpetuator to her accident but a person she carried emotional relations with. Leeza must have been romantically interested in Reef because she mentions how much he understood her throughout the story and how heartbroken she is. I believe Leeza is finding it hard to move past the accident, she seems to still carry some resentment towards Reef. I think this is mostly due to the feelings she has for Reef. It would have been easier for her to move past her accident if she wasn’t so emotionally hurt.

The Fifth Rule Week #2: Passage Master

 

Passage Explanation/Significance
  But it was too late. She is already moving toward them, and in three heartbeats she is beside the car and heading toward the sidewalk on Reef’s right. In that single moment, she is less than an arm’s reach from him, and he can almost hear her breathing as she passes. Does hear her breathing because his own has stopped. This passage is important because it confirmed that Reef is afraid of meeting and talking to Leeza. It got to the point where he stopped breathing because she was close to him, but it also tells us that he really misses and loves her. He got the courage to go to her house but he was wasn’t sure how she would have reacted if she met him.
  “Don’t talk to me about manipulation.” She pauses, takes another deep breath. “You’ve been controlling everything I’ve done since the accident.”

“That’s not true!”

“It is true.”

Leeza sees the wounded look on her mother’s face but she presses on. “I know you do it because you love me, but you treat me like a child. You watch my every move, tell me constantly what I should do, what I should wear. Today you even told me to watch out for cars when I cross the street!”

“Is it so wrong that I care what happens to you?”

This passage is very important in the way that I expected this to happen sometime soon when I read all the childish orders that Leeza’s mother gave her. This is also important in that Leeza lets of some steam by exploding and telling her mother everything she wanted to. Her mother has been extra careful and controlling after the accident 2 years ago and it was driving Leeza crazy.
  Wiping at sudden tears, Leeza gathers her books and stands, crossing in front of Jessica and the coffee guy to get to the door. “I’m sorry,” she mumbles to the professor as she hurries past him.  Someone else’s good news is the last thing she can bear to hear right now. This passage is important because it is a scene where Leeza is confused because she is sad that she fought with her mother, she isn’t sure if Reef has changed or has just betrayed her, and she is angry at her weak judgement of personality after thinking that Jessica is a slacker. She later found out that Jessica is just busy working because she needs money for her family. She was having a bad day all together and the stress from her courses made her even more emotional. She couldn’t hold back her tears and broke down in front of the class.

The Fifth Rule Week #2: Connector

Event #1: Roland Decker using propaganda in the news to make Reef look bad.

Type of connection: Connection:
Text to World There is a lot of bias when the topic is about Islam and Isis. News reporters that work for Fox are telling us that most terrorist attacks are Muslim-related. Like the issue, the news cut and edited the video of Reef’s speech so that only bad things were said, when really there were only good thoughts.

Event #2: Leeza argues with her mom over the news and about being overprotective.

Type of connection: Connection:
Text to Self Even though Leeza has gone through so much that has made her mother overprotective, I can relate. My mom watches the news everyday and she see stories about how kids get kidnapped and whenever I have plans to go somewhere, she does not let me go. She thinks that the same thing will happen to me.

Event #3: Leeza answering the calls from the creeps.

Type of connection: Connection:
Text to Self Leeza in the book gets many calls from a “creep”. I can relate because before my parents learned to block numbers, we would get calls from telemarketers very often. It would get to frequent to the point where I would pick up and go along with them, but instead of being serious, I would be foolish and play dumb. This would entertain me for a while.

From reading the previous chapters, I can predict that the creep who called Leeza was Reef and they plan to meet up because Brett was advising him to call her. I can also add that Reef will end up being caught with Leeza by Roland because Roland seems to be after Reef.

The Fifth Rule Week #2: The Illustrator

IMG_20150519_202426_edit

A drawing i created after reading about Leeza on page 57

           When reading page 57 of the fifth rule, I couldn’t help but notice how much emphasis was put on the scene where Reef sees Leeza for the first time in a long time. The author goes into great detail about her clothes and what she was doing. It wasn’t too hard to recreate the scene in a picture since Reef described her so much. I believe that the scene highlights the amount of feelings that Reef still has for Leeza.

The Fifth Rule Week #3: Passage Master

Passage Explanation/Significance
He sees the side door of the Connaught Avenue colonial open and Leeza appear wearing a tank top jeans and running shoes. He jerks back into the seat watching her hurry toward the detached garage. It shows that Reef still has extremely strong feelings for Leeza from the earlier chapters because of the way he flinches when he sees her. He is ready to see Leeza doesn’t think Leeza is ready to see.
The taxi driver take the next left and loops around the northbound lane. By the time they completed the turn, there’s no sign of Leeza, but the driver is undaunted. “we’ll catch her,” he says. The taxi driver he mentioned that he felt the girls from shy town so he understands what level did you and is willing to help me or maybe he wants more money.
Reef stands near the escalator now, watching the scene unfold across the food court from him, wishing you ask Brett one final question: is it Lisa seeing anyone? Because if she is. A man who, from here, looks to be in his late 20s. She had seem to stiffen as he approached her, hug her, but watching them sit the other now at the table across from you at fries, reef can clearly see they have feelings for each other. The man had held both her hands in his, his eyes never believing her face, and if she no offers and my smile that reef remembers only too well. That small had shown light into places that had been dark for too long, had move something inside him he thought was incapable of ever being moved again. The taxi driver he mentioned that he felt the girls from shy town so he understands what level did you and is willing to help me or maybe he wants more money.

The Fifth Rule Week #2: Word Wizard

 

Trent Arnold

Page # Word, Phrase, Or Passage Reason for Selecting Word, Phrase, Or Passage Why did the author select this word or phrase? What is the author trying to say? How does the diction help the author achieve his or her purpose?
74 My daughter is lying in a hospital bed with injuries to more than half of her body, and that animal was sentenced to be a volunteer! In a sentence where Leeza’s mother was very heated, she uses this word to describe a human being. I believe that the author wanted to add emphasis to the feelings that Leeza’s mother had towards Reef. The author wants the reader to see Reef as an animal, and to highlight his past as a delinquent.
78 “You knew this guy for a few weeks but you’re an expert on him.” Diane says, scorn tingeing her voice. I chose this word because it was not part of a sentence, but a phrase describing how a sentence was said. I think that the author used this word because it really helps to create a visualization of Leeza’s mother at the time. The author is trying to alter the emotion of the sentence from just sarcastic, to an angry tone.
90 Someone else’s good news is the last thing she can bear to hear right now. I chose this word because it helps summarize a very emotional scene. After a very emotional scene in the book, the author uses this word to summarize the feelings that Leeza had built up. The author shows that Leeza is so emotionally unstable that she cannot bear anyone else’s bad news.
93 It’s okay to be afraid. Fear is part of life. I chose this phrase because it is very meaningful. The author uses this phrase because Reef is afraid to see Leeza, and the fear is holding him back. Reef is thinking about this because he wants to call Leeza, but is too afraid to try.
 98 Reid came home talking a blue streak about you and the things you told his class. I chose this phrase because I initially did not know what it meant. The author wanted to create an image of Reid coming home from school and going on and on about what Reef said to the class. The term means to talk exitedly and rapidly, so Reid was obviously moved by the speech that Reef gave. This helped develop Reef as a character.